One kiss only

In an interview with the local Dutch newspaper ‘De Wassenaarse Krant’, the Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the ‘Queens Gala Dinner’ Maarten Auckerman discusses the habit of the Dutch of kissing three times in stead of two or one. Click on the article to enlarge.

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Educational session of MPI-Netherlands hosted by the Protocol Institute The Hague

Peter McSweeney, Bud Rellum and Anne-Maartje Oud

Last Friday 12 October 2012, the members of the Dutch ‘Meeting Professionals International‘ (MPI) were trained by the Institute of Protocol The Hague. MPI organised one of its ‘educational sessions’ at the beautiful Chateau St.Gerlach in the south of the Netherlands. The session started with an introduction of the new protocol-minor of the Institute of Protocol The Hague by Jean Paul Wyers. This was followed by a lecture about cross cultural management by Peter McSweeney and an interactive session about protocol by Anne-Maartje Oud and Bud Rellum. 

Chateau St.Gerlach at October 12

MPI is a global association for meeting and event professionals providing content, research and business connections enhancing the performance of its members. MPI has more than 21,000 members belonging to 71 chapters and clubs worldwide. MPI-Netherlands is one of those chapters. 

500 people in one room is not relationship management‘, explained Jean Paul Wyers during his introduction. In the current economic climate costly events are no longer being held, but organizations still want to make the most of their network. A good relationship with clients, investors and other stakeholders remains important. Modern protocol responds to this need.
The Protocol Institute recently started a minor in modern protocol and relationship management, in a cooperation with The Hague University. During six weeks the students learn how to develop a relationship management strategy and how to translate this strategy into a meeting with the stakeholders. The students of the minor are trained by the Dutch protocol and etiquette experts as well as by behavioural scientists, compliance and ethics officers, cross cultural managers and marketing managers. 
Developing a minor is a lot of work‘, Jean Paul explained. ‘It is a non-commercial activity, supported by many colleagues and meant to further professionalize the business of protocol and relationship management. Let’s hope we will succeed!’. 

Peter McSweeney about cross cultural management

Three trainers of the minor accompanied Jean Paul to Chateau St.Gerlach. The Irish-born Peter McSweeney talked about cross cultural management and gave the Dutch audience an outside perspective on its culture: ‘For me the Dutch Culture is to wear orange and celebrate the Royal Family‘. A culture is ‘the way we do things around here’, Peter explained. 
Important is to ask yourself: Who are you, who am I and how are we connected? 
This can be better understood with the theories of cultural differences guru’s like professor Geert Hofstede. Hofstede’s cultural dimensions can give an insight in the differences of cultures. 

Anne-Maartje Oud and Bud Rellum

Anne-Maartje Oud and Bud Rellum talked about protocol and the relevance of it to at all kinds of meetings. Bud Rellum was the protocol officer of the Dutch Prime-minister. He also worked all around the world for the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Bud: ‘Protocol is about managing expectations, make sure this is for both parties in balance‘. 
Anne-Maartje Oud is a coach in personal effectiveness. She makes people aware of their behavior and how it affects other people. Authenticity has never been more important’, she explained.

Read here a report about the session on the MPI-website (in Dutch). 

Photo left: The tweets of MPI-Netherlands.

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How to Impress Your Chinese Boss

If you plan to do business on the mainland, learn the rules
Read this article @ businessweek.com

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Mercedes-Benz head office as location for a relationship meeting







Photo’s: the ushers of the Protocolbureau at a relationship event last week

Last week, the Protocolbureau organised a relationship meeting for a Dutch enterprise at the head office of Mercedes-Benz Netherlands. This unique location has a reception area, show room, museum and auditorium suitable for up to hundreds of guests.

Five ushers welcomed the guests at the entrance of the head office and escorted them to the host of the event. Many guests were then introduced by the ushers to one of the account managers. Furthermore, account managers were seated next to guests during the symposium and the dinner. During the evening, there was also enough possibility for the guests to meet each other.
At the end, the guests were escorted outside by the ushers who also asked the them about their opinion on the evening.

The involvement of the Protocolbureau had six spearheads:
Organising the relationship meeting: how to see to it that the proper meetings took place?
Composing a guest list: how to make a list with common grounds that also supported the objectives of the meeting?
The invitation route: aiming for the desired attendance.
Briefing/training: how to support the hosts or hostesses?
Orchestrating meetings: how to make sure people will really meet each other?
Measurability: what are the results?
Want to know more: click here.

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Nieuwe campagne Protocolbureau: protocol in het zakenleven

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Sprout Magazine (in Dutch): Doe dit nooit tijdens een zakenlunch


Tijdens de zakenlunch gebeurt het. De basis voor vele zakelijke deals, promoties en toekomstige samenwerkingen wordt gelegd. Maar wie zijn lunch verprutst kan ook zijn zaken wel vergeten. Tips om uw culinaire opmaat naar business goed te doorstaan en wat u vooral niet moet doen.
Lees dit artikel op de site van Sprout Magazine, voor ondernemers

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The Art of the Receiving Line at Official Functions

Lisa Mirza Grotts
Etiquette Expert, Author
Posted: October 17, 2010 10:07 PM
Source: huffingtonpost.com

A receiving line is the perfect opportunity for guests and hosts to meet one another at a large event. They are only essential for groups of fifty or more, when it’s otherwise impossible for the hosts to greet everyone individually. They range from the most formal (for a high-ranking official such as a head of state) to the less formal and most common (honoring a visiting official or in celebration of an event). The event is more formal, lasts for a prescribed time, and always has a receiving line.
Read this article @ Huffington post

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yourdictionary.com:
receiving line
noun
A line of people formed to greet arriving guests individually, as at a formal gathering.

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How to Receive Guests in the Receiving Line @ weddings
Take the time to thank each guest for sharing this momentous occasion with you. At a particularly large wedding, this may be the only chance you’ll have.
Source: ehow.com
1 Set up the line outside the ceremony site doors or near the reception area.
2 Begin greeting guests after the ceremony but before the reception.
3 Place the bride’s parents at the head of the line (father on the left), followed by the groom’s parents (again, father on the left). Next in line is the bride, with the groom on her left, followed by the honor attendant and bridesmaids, if you choose to include them.
4 Have each person in line introduce the next person in the receiving line before greeting the next guest. This is also an opportunity for the bride to introduce her husband to friends and for his friends to meet her.
Read this article @: How to Receive Guests in the Receiving Line | eHow.com

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Attending Official Receptions: The Art of the Receiving Line
Packed with Protocol: When the US Entertains at Home and Abroad
The information contained herein is quoted from Social Usage and Protocol Handbook: A Guide for Personnel of the U.S. Navy (OPNAVINST 1710.7 dated 17 JUL 1979). Here is the suggestions that form the basis of official US Protocol.
Source: whitehousecorrespondentsweekendinsider.com

President Ford Host White House Event for Queen Elizabeth
Receptions are the most popular form of official entertainment for they allow wide variance in the number of guests invited and in the formality of the occasion. They range from the very formal, which might be a reception after 8:00 p.m. hosted by an ambassador in honor of his visiting chief of state, to the less formal, perhaps that hosted by a military attache from 8 to 10 o’clock in the evening in celebration of Armed Forces Day. The most common and least formal affair is held from approximately 6 to 8 o’clock, frequently in honor of a visiting official or in celebration of some event.

Characteristically, receptions differ from the simple cocktail party in that they are intended to honor individuals or a specific occasion, the atmosphere is somewhat more formal, their duration is prescribed, and there is always a receiving line.

The thoughtful host/hostess who plans a reception in honor of a high-ranking official will consult with the latter regarding a mutually agreeable date and time before ordering invitations. As indicated in Invitations, the person or the occasion being feted may be indicated on the invitation in one of several ways.

Guests should arrive before the receiving line disbands, normally within the first 35 minutes of the reception. The order of persons in the receiving line may vary with the type of occasion and desires of the hosting official.
Read this article @ whitehousecorrespondentsweekendinsider.com

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A receiving line:

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Protocol: How to coordinate the greeting procedures at a business event (commentary in Dutch)


How to operate when the CEO (as host of a business event) wants to welcome every guest in person (and when this CEO wants to know who is who).
In this case, the employees of the company function as co-host. They await the guests in a reception area and each greet a number of guests, after they welcomed by the host.

The role of protocol officers:
Protocol officers inform guests upon arrival: by whom will they be welcomed? Then they announce the guest to the host, by name and function.
Furthermore the protocol officers will prevent queues, so people do not have to wait.
After the welcome by the host, guests are escorted to one of the co-hosts in the reception area. Guests are again informed: to which co-host will they be brought. And the co-hosts are told: what is the name and function of the guest.

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Business Etiquette Can Shape Firm’s Reputation


Anna Post, author and spokesperson, The Emily Post Institute
Source: hartfordbusiness.com

Q&A talks with Anna Post, great-great-granddaughter of etiquette expert Emily Post, and an author and spokesperson for The Emily Post Institute. She is a presenter of Emily Post Business Etiquette Seminars.
Q: You’re speaking at a Tunxis Community College Foundation breakfast on Oct. 6 at Avon Old Farms Inn in Avon on “Business Etiquette and Its Impact on Your Bottom Line.” What are some examples of business etiquette impacting the bottom line?
A: Statistics show that incivility in the workplace can cause workers to waste work time worrying about rudeness, avoiding the instigator, or even cause them to leave their job — a job they are qualified to do. This has a negative effect on productivity and retention, not to mention recruitment and company reputation when the word gets out. On the flip side, workplaces that actively promote a civil work environment have significantly higher productivity and customer loyalty.

Q: At the end of the day, how much difference does business etiquette make? Don’t nice guys finish last? Can your career end because of an etiquette faux pas?
A: Yes, there are plenty of stories about how someone was fired for a breach of good etiquette — which often amounts to a breach of old fashioned common sense — as opposed to being fired for lack of technical job skills. My goal in the presentation is to focus on increasing awareness by identifying places where we have a choice to make and then making the right choice, not only to avoid trouble but to make the best possible impression on others. Etiquette is about something much more essential and important than holding your pinkie finger out while you drink tea — it’s about treating others with consideration, respect, and honesty. Do this, and you can still be an assertive go-getter — it will only take you further, faster.

Read the rest @ Hartford Business.com

Train with Emily Post in October, Start a New Career as an Emily Post Trained Instructor by November:
Call Dawn today at 802-860-1814 to sign up for our week-long business etiquette train the trainer course, October 11-15, 2010, in Florham Park, New Jersey. You’ll be trained by The Emily Post Institute to teach others how to create and maintain a civil workplace. Good manners is the most important “soft skill” necessary for success in today’s brutally competitive job market.

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Customer Service Etiquette: How to Keep Your Customers Happy

The Huffington Post
Lisa Mirza GrottsEtiquette Expert, Author
Posted: April 4, 2010 06:47 PM

Who doesn’t feel welcome at Disneyland? Walt Disney got it right when he said, “Do what you do so well that they will want to see it again and bring their friends.” If only life were as simple as a fairy-tale.

Shirley Temple presented Walt Disney with his special Academy Award for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs 1937.

A good salesperson can sell anything, but keeping the customer coming back for more is the key to measuring success. These days, promotions galore are getting customers in the door, but are they repeat customers? Making a customer happy is not always easy, so what can we do to help?

Read the rest of the article @ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-mirza-grotts/customer-service-etiquett_b_524806.html

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